Day 5: Kasumi-So Senior Home / by airi katsuta

We headed to Kasumi-So senior home later that day. We took a train and since we didn't have breakfast or lunch, we ate the Taiyaki that we got earlier.

We arrived to Watanoha Station 10 minutes later. The palm trees reminded me of Arizona. Though Ishinomaki city is the 2nd most populated areas in Miyagi prefecture, the train only comes by every 2 hours. This is unbelievable compared to Tokyo where the train comes every 5 minutes. The train only has 2 cars since the tsunami disaster, but they plan on adding more next year.

We finally arrived to Kasumi-So Senior Home. We brought the handmade knitted scarves and clothing made by the wonderful folks of Japanese American Citizens League. I hope they like it!

Manjome-San is the head manager of this senior home. When asked about what happened on 3-11 she said, "Right after the earthquake, one of the seniors said the tsunami will follow soon. So all of us evacuated to the mountains before the tsunami warning even went off. So thankful for the wise knowledge of the elderly, they were all safe."

"After we evacuated, I realized I forgot to grab the medicine for my patients. We were in such a rush, I knew I shouldn't go back but I went anyways. When I was driving back, I saw a little girl crying on the side of the street. I picked her up and while I was driving, the tsunami came. I didn't know what was happening, but thankfully someone reached a hand from the 2nd floor of a building and saved us." Though she was talking very calmly, what was coming out of her mouth was unimaginably horrifying.

"There were many people at the temple. Since the damage of this area was unbelievable, the bridge was gone so the military couldn't even come to this side of the town for 2 days. I was very worried. Some elderly people didn't have their medicine so they were turning blue, or going crazy."

"People started to find out that I work at the senior home. They thought we would have medicine to share, but we didn't have any either. It pained me to turn them away."

With tears forming in her eyes, she spoke softly, "We went down the mountain when the water level decreased... And I stepped into hell."

"The people who evacuated to the mountains didn't directly see the tsunami, so it was shocking to see the aftermath. There were dead bodies everywhere, a lot of them in their cars. It felt like a war zone. I was actually seeing hell."

"We had our one year anniversary of this institution the day after the tsunami. We were saying how it's been a year and then it happened." The seniors were transferred to a hospital out of prefecture, so they were safe and taken care of. They were more worried about us (the caretakers) if we had enough food."

After a year and a half, she said there are times where she feels depressed. "Year and a half flew by so fast. The reconstruction takes a long time, I know that. I get depressed quite often, and put a stop to myself. Most of us suppressed our emotions. My tears dried up after a while, I was tired of crying. Thankfully, all of my family members survived, but many of the workers' didn't. My daughter's friend's body was found 3 months later. And all that was said was "They found another one." It was hard to feel anymore. It was all too much."

We gave them the letter, pictures, and the handmade items from Japanese American Citizens League. They were very ecstatic to receive them since they lost most of their winter clothes in the tsunami. "Thank you so much. The winters are so cold here! It gets cold by September. Now to think of it, it was snowing the day after the tsunami. "

Everyone's faces were covered in smiles. We dispersed the clothing to everyone and they loved it. This lady wore hers already even though it was hot!

We also gave them the crochet animals too. They were saying how cute it was. She was a funny one, "I'm a kangaroo."

She's 95 years old and loved the shawl. "Give them a peace sign", the manager said.

We woke him up from his nap, but this 99 year old man picked the white vest. He can't hear very much so they had to shout in his left ear. When they told him that we brought them clothes, he smiled and said "Thank you."

She liked this blue shawl very much. "I like it, it's fancy!" Such complicated and beautiful design, all handmade by JACL.

"Blue is a man's color." "Looking good!" the women shouted. He blushed a little bit as I took his picture.

Everyone got several items to keep. Rather than taking it to a large senior home and not have enough, we picked the one with 6 people. They shared their stories with us and welcome us into their home. Thank you to Kasumi-So senior home and JACL for providing the clothing!