photography

Kats Sisters Photoshoot by airi katsuta

Airi Katsuta, Riho Katsuta 【日本語の文章は英語の後にあります】

It's been exactly a year since my last blog post... My apologies.

A lot has happened in a year. To keep it short and simple, I've made a list.

  1. I went around the world again with Peace Boat as their official photographer. It was the same route as the last time, and second time was much easier work wise. I was also able to enjoy myself much more and photograph much better. It was amazing to reconnect with the people that I met last year as well.
  2. I got promoted, and became the Audio/Visual Technician at the Phoenix Art Museum. I'm learning the IT side of the museum and also in the planning process of doing some photography/videography. It's keeping me busy so that's good.
  3. I've been doing photoshoots here and there which I will post on my website once it gets published.
  4. Lastly, I did a photoshoot... with me in it!

riho&airi-square-03

That's the photo you see above. We did a "Kats Sisters" photoshoot, that's my older sister Riho on the left, and me on the right. Usually I'm behind the camera, but it was my first time being in the shot, and directing it. My cousin, Hiroto, assisted me with pushing the remote to take the photos. We blew up 50 balloons which didn't take much time with the three of us, like the last time we did the balloon shoot! I'd set up the camera on a tripod and frame everything and then I'd run back and pose. It was hard running back and forth with my heels on. Riho's always been a natural at posing but I definitely am not. Modeling is a serious skill that I admire, which I lack. I should've practiced a little more on facial expressions and postures but I just got so nervous in front of the camera. I feel much more comfortable taking the pictures.

riho&airi-square-07

But I learned so much from this experience.

I need to get better at giving directions, better time management, and STOP HUNCHING!

It was a good experience all in all. I think the pictures turned out pretty nice too. I think by just looking at these pictures, you can probably tell we get along pretty well. We're sisters and we're best friends.

riho&airi-square-10

You can see more pictures on my website.

xo,

Airi

Kats Sisters 写真撮影

最後にブログをアップしてからもう一年も経っちゃいました・・・ごめんなさい。

この一年はいろんなことがありました。

  1. ピースボートで専属のフォトグラファーとしてまた世界を一周しました(その時のクルーズレポートはこちらで読めます)。前回と同じ航路だったので仕事は前よりも効率的にできました。仕事も遊びも写真も、前回よりも上手くできていたとおもいます。去年出会った人たちと再会できたのが素敵でした。
  2. Phoenix Art Museum (フェニックス美術館)でオーディオ・ビジュアル・テクニシャンに昇進しました。美術館のITの面や写真・映像などのプランニングを任されています。これで結構忙しくなりました。
  3. 写真の撮影も継続しています。まだ載せれないものもあるので、載せれるようになったらウェブサイトに随時アップしたいとおもいます。
  4. それから・・・自分がモデルとして入っている写真撮影をしました!

この写真がその撮影からのものです。「Kats Sisters」というプロジェクトでお姉ちゃんと二人で姉妹の写真を撮ってみました。左がお姉ちゃんの里穂で、右が自分です。普段は自分は常にカメラの後ろにいますが、今回は初めて撮影の監督をして自分も写される側にまわりました。アシスタントを従兄弟のヒロトにお願いして、カメラのリモコンシャッターを押してもらいました。風船とヘリウムタンクを買って、50個の風船を膨らませました。3人で協力したので、前回のように準備にはそこまで時間がかからなかったです。カメラを三脚に設定して、構成を確認して、走ってフレームに入ってポーズする・・・の繰り返し。ヒールで走り回るのは結構大変でした。里穂はいつも自然にポーズがとれるのに、愛里は全然ダメ。モデルの仕事ってスキルが必要で本当に感心します。愛里ももう少し表情の作り方とか姿勢とか練習しなきゃ。カメラの前にでると緊張しちゃって上手くポーズがとれませんでした。写真を撮る方がもっとリラックスしてできる。

今回の撮影で学ぶことは多かったです。もっと上手く指示を出せるようになる、タイム・マネージメントの能力を上げる、それから猫背をやめる!でも写真も上手く出来上がったので良かったです。写真を見てわかると思いますが、めちゃくちゃ仲が良いです。姉妹であって親友であるって幸せなことです。

この撮影の写真はウェブサイトこちらでごらんください。

Around the World, and I'm Back Again! by airi katsuta

So I'm back to Arizona, my home sweet home, after being away for 5 months on a global voyage with Peace Boat. I was working as a Japanese Web Reporter / Photographer to document the daily events that go on board and special reports for on location, write multiple reports everyday for general audiences who are interested in what life on board is like, for family members who are on land to know where their loved ones are at, and for passengers to reflect back on their voyage after their trip is over. I wrote close to 200 reports, and I cannot begin to tell you how difficult it was! Writing in Japanese was definitely a big challenge for me. I've acted the messenger role with Great East Japan Earthquake & Tsunami project where I wrote the survivor stories of the people in Ishinomaki, but it was always in English. It was my first time being away from home, and working in a Japanese setting, so language and culture was a lot to take in. The electronic dictionary (電子辞書) was my best friend.

I went in with the mindset that "I'm young, it's 0kay to make mistakes, it's a MUST to ask questions because I don't know everything, "  And let me tell ya, I made many mistakes, I asked so many questions, and realized there are kind people that have a lot to share and are willing to lend a hand. With my 105 days on board, I learned to appreciate people on a deeper level because they were there when I was in a time of need. There are more to each country than what tourism has to offer, especially with the cultural exchange tours that Peace Boat provides, it was great to interact with locals in their environment and have that experience. Here are some of the photos of the countries I went to that are on view on my website. See full albums on http://www.airikatsuta.com/global-voyage

Here is a little bit of a preview, but you can go to my website to see more!   And I was blessed with an opportunity to go on another voyage with Peace Boat as a web reporter again. So in November (which is in a couple more months!) I'll be in Japan and then off to explore the world again. In the meantime, I am making art in different mediums (photography, origami, india ink, watercolor, ceramics, and even henna!) I am working at the Phoenix Art Museum being a Gallery Attendant, Control Room Operator, Projectionist, and back at Method Art Gallery being an assistant to Davin Lavikka  and doing multiple duties. Hopefully I'll have an exhibition coming up there so I will keep you guys posted!

Day 8: Taiwan Friends by airi katsuta

As I was riding my bike along the Manga Road, I saw pretty colors peeking from the corner of the street. I stopped to see what was going on, and saw adorable chalk drawings on the pavement. I've never seen chalk drawing so beautiful in my life. Seeing this brought a smile to my face as well as the locals. This brightened up the street!

After staring and lurking and taking a bunch of pictures, these nice people explained to me that they're a group of artists from Taiwan supporting Ishinomaki. Different styles of artists were here and they told me they painted murals on houses and made public art to bring joy into the town.  They also gave me a good luck charm :)

They told me I can contribute to the drawings so I put my drawing skills to the test....

And I drew a cat. But someone said it looks like Pink Panther. I guess they're kinda right lol

My cat looks like it was done by a 4 year old compared to this great looking mountain next to it! Mad props!

Lots of locals told me they are really thankful for the organization from Taiwan. Some elderly people kept their cash at home so they lost most of their savings in the tsunami. The locals said the people from Taiwan handed out money to anyone who got in line. These people were painting a very large mural on the side of the building. They each had their own distinctive style. I didn't stay long enough to see it completed, so I can't wait to go back and check it out :)

 Since they were so nice to me, and anyone who helps Ishinomaki is automatically my friend, I gave them one of the crochet cats! I hope they liked it :)

Its crazy how you meet so many different kinds of people through the same cause. I wish them the best of luck :)

Day 7: part 3, Kawamura Magobe gravesite, oceanside, fish market by airi katsuta

After visiting Tsuda-san, Ted and I visited Kawamura Magobe gravesite. Kawamura Magobe is an important person in Ishinomaki history. He was a technical expert in Omi Province, and he constructed the Port of Ishinomaki at the mouth of Kitakami-gawa River. Peace boat volunteers worked hard to clean up this gravesite, but the clean up isn't complete yet.

Mabo Tofu.

Then we went to the Chinese restaurant near Kaska. It was so cheap! And lots of food! I was stuffed.

Ooper Looper

I found a funy looking fish/lizard? It's called a Ooper Looper. I've never seen anything like this, it looked like a Pokemon.

We drove around town again. And we drove by the mountains of trash piled up everywhere.

Japan Paper Company.

This is a paper company located right by the coast. Paper and water doesn't go well together, so after the tsunami most of their materials were ruined. The huge rolls of paper was very heavy when it soaked up all the water.

San Juan Bautista.

This is a museum that displays the San Juan Bautista, a Spanish style galleon built in the 17th century. Though this is a replica, the actual ship was built in 1613 by Date Masamune, the lord of the Sendai Clan. The ship transported an envoy to the Pope in Rome, stopping at Acapulco, Mexico on the way. The boat had very minimal damage from the tsunami but the museum was closed.

Beach.

Most of the beaches are closed for swimming since not everything is cleaned up from all the scraps. This beach is mostly for fishing tho.

"The bottom of the sea is all messed up because of the tsunami. I can't catch any fish!"

I asked this fisherman how it's like fishing here. He said he could catch all different kinds of fish before but he said "the bottom of the sea is all messed up because of the tsunami. I can't catch any fish!" Even if he can't catch anything, he still comes here to fish. I'm guessing he comes here to relax.

Buoys.
Sea Bugs?
Shells used to raise oysters.

Oyster harvesting is very big in Ishinomaki, and it's considered the main area that imports oyster seeds to all over the world. I LOVE OYSTERS, and it was cool to see how they raise baby oysters. This made me salivate a little bit.

Fiiiiish market.

We then went to the fish market. Originally, this market was placed right near the coast, but they relocated for now. This fish was huge! I wear a size 6 shoe so like 3 of my shoes was the size of this fish!

Sea Urchin!

I've never seen a sea urchin with the spikes on. All I could think was sushi. I bet the fresh ones tastes really good :)

Cleaning the sea urchin.

She was cleaning the insides out to get the meat out of it. She was using a tweezer very carefully to get the black parts out and leaving the orangey/yellowish insides.

FINALLY! OYSTER!
YUMMAH!

I finally got to eat some oysters! This particular one wasn't grown in Ishinomaki, but it was fresh nonetheless. Oyster season is around November, and they even have a festival dedicated to them! Hopefully next year, I can go to one of them and eat lots and lots of oysters! :)

Day 5: Kasumi-So Senior Home by airi katsuta

We headed to Kasumi-So senior home later that day. We took a train and since we didn't have breakfast or lunch, we ate the Taiyaki that we got earlier.

We arrived to Watanoha Station 10 minutes later. The palm trees reminded me of Arizona. Though Ishinomaki city is the 2nd most populated areas in Miyagi prefecture, the train only comes by every 2 hours. This is unbelievable compared to Tokyo where the train comes every 5 minutes. The train only has 2 cars since the tsunami disaster, but they plan on adding more next year.

We finally arrived to Kasumi-So Senior Home. We brought the handmade knitted scarves and clothing made by the wonderful folks of Japanese American Citizens League. I hope they like it!

Manjome-San is the head manager of this senior home. When asked about what happened on 3-11 she said, "Right after the earthquake, one of the seniors said the tsunami will follow soon. So all of us evacuated to the mountains before the tsunami warning even went off. So thankful for the wise knowledge of the elderly, they were all safe."

"After we evacuated, I realized I forgot to grab the medicine for my patients. We were in such a rush, I knew I shouldn't go back but I went anyways. When I was driving back, I saw a little girl crying on the side of the street. I picked her up and while I was driving, the tsunami came. I didn't know what was happening, but thankfully someone reached a hand from the 2nd floor of a building and saved us." Though she was talking very calmly, what was coming out of her mouth was unimaginably horrifying.

"There were many people at the temple. Since the damage of this area was unbelievable, the bridge was gone so the military couldn't even come to this side of the town for 2 days. I was very worried. Some elderly people didn't have their medicine so they were turning blue, or going crazy."

"People started to find out that I work at the senior home. They thought we would have medicine to share, but we didn't have any either. It pained me to turn them away."

With tears forming in her eyes, she spoke softly, "We went down the mountain when the water level decreased... And I stepped into hell."

"The people who evacuated to the mountains didn't directly see the tsunami, so it was shocking to see the aftermath. There were dead bodies everywhere, a lot of them in their cars. It felt like a war zone. I was actually seeing hell."

"We had our one year anniversary of this institution the day after the tsunami. We were saying how it's been a year and then it happened." The seniors were transferred to a hospital out of prefecture, so they were safe and taken care of. They were more worried about us (the caretakers) if we had enough food."

After a year and a half, she said there are times where she feels depressed. "Year and a half flew by so fast. The reconstruction takes a long time, I know that. I get depressed quite often, and put a stop to myself. Most of us suppressed our emotions. My tears dried up after a while, I was tired of crying. Thankfully, all of my family members survived, but many of the workers' didn't. My daughter's friend's body was found 3 months later. And all that was said was "They found another one." It was hard to feel anymore. It was all too much."

We gave them the letter, pictures, and the handmade items from Japanese American Citizens League. They were very ecstatic to receive them since they lost most of their winter clothes in the tsunami. "Thank you so much. The winters are so cold here! It gets cold by September. Now to think of it, it was snowing the day after the tsunami. "

Everyone's faces were covered in smiles. We dispersed the clothing to everyone and they loved it. This lady wore hers already even though it was hot!

We also gave them the crochet animals too. They were saying how cute it was. She was a funny one, "I'm a kangaroo."

She's 95 years old and loved the shawl. "Give them a peace sign", the manager said.

We woke him up from his nap, but this 99 year old man picked the white vest. He can't hear very much so they had to shout in his left ear. When they told him that we brought them clothes, he smiled and said "Thank you."

She liked this blue shawl very much. "I like it, it's fancy!" Such complicated and beautiful design, all handmade by JACL.

"Blue is a man's color." "Looking good!" the women shouted. He blushed a little bit as I took his picture.

Everyone got several items to keep. Rather than taking it to a large senior home and not have enough, we picked the one with 6 people. They shared their stories with us and welcome us into their home. Thank you to Kasumi-So senior home and JACL for providing the clothing!

Day 5: part 2 by airi katsuta

This is Ishinomori Mangattan Museum dedicated to the most famous Manga artist in Ishinomaki. It's being repaired right now but will be open to the public in October.

Lots of cars cross this bridge to get to the other side of the river. Can you believe the tsunami covered this whole area underwater? Crazy.

Past the bridge, there was  a sign of where the waterline was.

Being near the river, some houses around here are too far gone to be repaired. The town is focusing on houses that are still repairable, and leaving the destroyed ones for later. It seemed like at any moment, this house could collapse.

Cleaning takes a long time and a lot of strength. Though it still seems dirty, I bet that this place took a lot of people to get it this far to remove large scraps and shoveling sludge.

Riho wanted to visit the house where she found a friendly cat last year. We asked this nice gentleman where it was. He pointed in a direction and lead us there. But he told us that they demolished the house.

The tsunami ripped open this whole wall of this house. A lot of houses in this area looked similar.

I found a chair of what seems like came from a hair salon. I didn't see any buildings that looked like one so I think the water traveled this chair here.

Day 5: Around the Kyu-Kita-Kami River by airi katsuta

Before I start this post, I wanted to thank all of you that have been taking a look at this blog. I've been getting views from all over the world, in 25 countries including Japan, USA, Argentina, Ireland, France, Australia, etc. My purpose is to share the stories of Ishinomaki to as many people as I can. Everyone has a different story which wasn't on mainstream news, of how the ground shook so much that they couldn't stay standing up, how they couldn't reach their family members for days so they walked in the water waist deep to search for them, how they spent days without food or water on top of a roof, how they got caught in the water and climbed on to a floating car. We live in a world where internet makes everything accessible, so I am trying to share the stories that I heard face to face from the survivors of the 3-11 earthquake/tsunami. They are so brave and positive, such beautiful souls. I'm just a messenger.

We visited the Taiyaki (Japanese dessert) shop that Riho went to last year. I guess this store was the only thing opened in this area so Riho was happy to see that it's still in business. And it was the best Taiyaki I've ever had!

There's a lot of areas along the river that hasn't been repaired yet.

This bridge is called Nishi-Naikai Bashi. This bridge is used by many people so it is in the middle of reconstruction. One side of the sidewalk is completely closed so it was kind of scary riding our bikes alongside cars on such a narrow bridge.

I think I have a cat radar. Last year, I didn't see any stray cats. But now they're starting to appear again. This made me happy.

There was a little market place down the street where all the shops that were ruined by the tsunami got together. They're in trailers so this is temporary, but it's nice to see that they're open for business already.

Inside their cafeteria, they had pictures of before/after pictures of the town. In attendance were many tourists from all over Japan.

This is a drawing of Anpanman, a very popular kids anime. The theme song translates to "Do not fear, for everyone. Love and courage is your only friend." Even though it is a kids song, it was played a lot last year while volunteering. It sent out a positive message to everyone.

All over town, there are signs or ads of words of encouragement. "We are cheering for your energy/spirits!"

Next to this play set was a Japanese flag waving in the wind. Though it was ripped, it was still standing strong.

Day 4: Watanabe-san by airi katsuta

One of our missions for this trip was to give out the hand knitted clothing that the wonderful people of Japanese American Citizens League had made to the senior homes in Ishinomaki. So we contacted the nearby senior home to schedule an appointment for an interview. But when Riho talked to them over the phone, they said that they were not affected by the tsunami at all, so they would rather have us give the knitted clothing to a senior home that is more deserving. We wanted to hear their story, tsunami-damaged or not, because everyone was affected by this tragic event, one way or another.

This senior home is called Wakou-en. And this is the head manager, Watanabe-san. He said that on 3-11, he wasn't at the senior home or even in Ishinomaki. He couldn't get back until 5 days later, but the tsunami didn't reach the building because it was on a hill, but the earthquake had caused damage to the water pipes beneath the structure.

He showed us a book with aerial photographs of Ishinomaki, before and after. Since we are not familiar with the area, he showed us where everything is in detail and even gave us the book.

"Even if it's in the same city of Ishinomaki, the amount of damage is different in every area. Ishinomaki combined 5 towns, so it's pretty broad," Watanabe-san said. When we asked how this senior home have changed after the tsunami, he said "a lot of our patients have dementia, so most of them don't even know what happened. They didn't actually see the water. It shook a lot from the earthquake, so some walls have cracks but it's not very obvious from what people can see." He said very apologetically.

He showed us several other senior homes that had a lot of damage on the map.

"It hasn't changed so much for us. Sorry about that. But I'll introduce you to other senior homes that I know that suffered a lot. Let me give them a call."

We've been blessed to meet people like him all over the city of Ishinomaki. Everyday, someone lends a hand to us. We're very thankful.

Day 2: part 4. by airi katsuta

Day 2 was a very long day with so much to see, but this one is the final post of Day 2.

Kadonowaki-cho is very close to the coastline, and there is a river that flows near by. So when the tsunami came, this area was affected before any of the damage in the inland occured. As a memorial, people still bring flowers as offering to the deceased.

"Ganbarou" is a phrase that is used frequently here. It's hard to do a direct translation because I don't think it even exists in English. It kind of means, "hang in there", "we can do this", "let's stick it out", "don't give up" all mixed together. A man who owned a building around here put this sign up a few months after the tsunami, as words of encouragement. When people saw this sign, it gave them hope to get back on their feet.

The bar sticking out in the middle from this pole marks how high the water line ended up to be in this area. Houses and cars were easily lifted up with this much water and severely damaged.

People used schools as a emergency evacuation area. This school was no exception and many people came here to get away from the water. But when the tsunami came, as it pushed all the houses and factory with it, the building caught on fire and collided into this school. The school started burning but thankfully, everyone worked together and somehow connected chairs and desks on the roof to escape to the hill in the back. That's teamwork right there. No lives were taken from this school, but a school only a few miles away took away many children's lives.

This is a park that is located on the hill right behind the school. Since this hill was tall enough, the tsunami did not reach them. This park gives the whole view of the coastline, so on 3-11, they could see the black waves rushing inland.

From Hiyoriyama park, you can see the Ishinomori Manga-kan, a museum dedicated to Ishinomaki's most famous Manga artist. There was also a church in the same area, but I am guessing thats where the Statue of Liberty is standing.

We did a lot of walking so a we took a little break on this bench. Ted is a little camera shy so I had to force him to sit there. haha.

This temple is right on the top of Hiyoriyama hill. I felt a rush of culture through me as I embraced my Japanese heritage.

At the entrance of the temple, there was a display of many strands of 1000 cranes. In a Japanese folklore, if you make a thousand cranes, your wish will come true. Not a wish for materialistic things, but for health and recovery. Making a thousand cranes isn't easy, speaking from experience. It took me around 2 minutes per crane so 33 hours of crane origami folding… that's dedication.

This child put a message with the cranes saying "I send you strength and hope." This one was sent from Tokyo.

After making a monetary offering at the temple, we received a fortune. Mine told me, "Have a peaceful heart, be kind to my parents and your household will be fine. Even if there is trouble outside, your family will be filled with happiness. Give it your all to help others. "

After going back to the hotel, I saw a sign on a garage door saying "Thank you to everyone all around the world. People of Ishinomaki will persevere." With positive words on every wall and doors and pillars, it made me feel good, and all the volunteering worth it.

COOL: success! by airi katsuta

Thank you everyone for coming out to see our show, Cool.

The opening reception was a BIG SUCCESS! Gallery 100 was packed, and even our teacher said he's never seen it so filled up before. The food that we provided (pizza, hummus, baklava, nachos) were gone within the first hour, Danielle's super cool party favors (cone hats, COOL buttons, sequin masks) were a huge hit, and everyone had a great time!

I got great feedback from everyone who saw my 1,000 cranes, as well as my photographs. I met new people, built new connections, and learned what I could do to make it better.

Having this exhibition was a great experience. We, the Cool. people, had great teamwork. Everyone had their own unique style and it made our show enjoyable to everyone.

Thank you everyone for stopping by, and thank you to my team for making this experience SUPER COOL!

:),

airi

COOL. by airi katsuta

COOL. : BFA Photography exhibition

The artists of COOL. tackle a wide range of subject matters with a kindred respect for the language of photography.

The eight photographers have worked alongside each other in varied but complimentary methods for the past several years and now present Cool. as the collective culmination of their undergraduate photography educations.

Come enjoy food, refreshments, party favors, and great art.

Join the fun and support the work of BFA in photography candidates:

Ashley Hom Will Jenkins Valeria Echeverria Airi Katsuta Danielle Mariscal Virginia Martinez Bucky Miller Annie Wechter

ASU Gallery 100 Exhibition: January 23- 27 Opening Reception: January 24 6pm-8pm

Suite 199, Northeast corner of 10th Street and Mill ave. (located just north of the ASU Art Museum Ceramics Research Center) Hours: Monday–Thursday: Noon – 5 p.m. Friday: noon – 3 p.m.