Day 2: part 4. / by airi katsuta

Day 2 was a very long day with so much to see, but this one is the final post of Day 2.

Kadonowaki-cho is very close to the coastline, and there is a river that flows near by. So when the tsunami came, this area was affected before any of the damage in the inland occured. As a memorial, people still bring flowers as offering to the deceased.

"Ganbarou" is a phrase that is used frequently here. It's hard to do a direct translation because I don't think it even exists in English. It kind of means, "hang in there", "we can do this", "let's stick it out", "don't give up" all mixed together. A man who owned a building around here put this sign up a few months after the tsunami, as words of encouragement. When people saw this sign, it gave them hope to get back on their feet.

The bar sticking out in the middle from this pole marks how high the water line ended up to be in this area. Houses and cars were easily lifted up with this much water and severely damaged.

People used schools as a emergency evacuation area. This school was no exception and many people came here to get away from the water. But when the tsunami came, as it pushed all the houses and factory with it, the building caught on fire and collided into this school. The school started burning but thankfully, everyone worked together and somehow connected chairs and desks on the roof to escape to the hill in the back. That's teamwork right there. No lives were taken from this school, but a school only a few miles away took away many children's lives.

This is a park that is located on the hill right behind the school. Since this hill was tall enough, the tsunami did not reach them. This park gives the whole view of the coastline, so on 3-11, they could see the black waves rushing inland.

From Hiyoriyama park, you can see the Ishinomori Manga-kan, a museum dedicated to Ishinomaki's most famous Manga artist. There was also a church in the same area, but I am guessing thats where the Statue of Liberty is standing.

We did a lot of walking so a we took a little break on this bench. Ted is a little camera shy so I had to force him to sit there. haha.

This temple is right on the top of Hiyoriyama hill. I felt a rush of culture through me as I embraced my Japanese heritage.

At the entrance of the temple, there was a display of many strands of 1000 cranes. In a Japanese folklore, if you make a thousand cranes, your wish will come true. Not a wish for materialistic things, but for health and recovery. Making a thousand cranes isn't easy, speaking from experience. It took me around 2 minutes per crane so 33 hours of crane origami folding… that's dedication.

This child put a message with the cranes saying "I send you strength and hope." This one was sent from Tokyo.

After making a monetary offering at the temple, we received a fortune. Mine told me, "Have a peaceful heart, be kind to my parents and your household will be fine. Even if there is trouble outside, your family will be filled with happiness. Give it your all to help others. "

After going back to the hotel, I saw a sign on a garage door saying "Thank you to everyone all around the world. People of Ishinomaki will persevere." With positive words on every wall and doors and pillars, it made me feel good, and all the volunteering worth it.