Day 2: part 3. / by airi katsuta

Nakazato-san:

This is also a house that Ted and Peaceboat helped clean.

This is Nakazato-san. He's a really petite grandpa with a heavy Tohoku accent so it was really hard to understand him at times, but he was very kind and repeated it for me many times.

He pointed and said, "The water came from over there, and all of a sudden it was everywhere "

He warned his neighbors that the tsunami was coming, but by the time he tried to escape it, he was already in the water. Since the water level was around 6 to 7 feet, he got on the roof of the house next door. And then jumped on a car which floated by his storage(the one with the brown roof and blue covers), and then jumped to his house (the one next to the pink house, being repaired). His story was famous when I was volunteering, and I couldn't believe that a little 80 year old man jumped roof to roof.

He was my height, so around 5 feet. He was really nice and showed us his garden with cucumbers, chives, pumpkins, and tomatoes. People around here seem to grow their own vegetables. He got a little camera shy but he agreed to take a picture with us.

Nanakita-san:

We arrived at another house the Peaceboat volunteers cleaned, but the house was still in its reconstructive stage and no one lived there. And then this man came up to us asking what we were doing. His name is Nanakita-san, and he is the head of the community council in this area. The previous owner decided to move, so Nanakita-san decided to buy it from them.

His house is only 4 houses away, but due to the Article 39 and 84 of the Building Standard Law, it prohibits housing and reconstruction in certain areas that dealt with great damage. Nanakita-san's house was completely flooded, large tree logs from the nearby factory tore his house, and even a car was smashed in it. Though his house was unrepairable, since he wanted to stay in this area, he decided to buy this house.

Though we came looking for another person, Nanakita-san welcomed us to his community and informed us on what the reconstruction laws were. He was very nice. When I asked to take a picture with him, he said "Ummm. Let's do a thumbs up!"

Shokodo:

This was a publishing company's warehouse that took 30 peace boat volunteers to clean. It took about 2 days to clean, but still had more work left to do. It was raining that day, and usually volunteers aren't allowed to work in conditions like this due to accident prevention but we decided to do it anyways because we didn't want to spend the whole day not doing anything. The outside of this building looks fairly fine, but the inside was a disaster. Since this warehouse contained mainly paper, it was everywhere mixed with sludge. All their materials were damaged so for them it was heartbreaking to throw away so many books, pamphlets, magazines, and posters. There was a van flipped on the side inside as well. But since we got most of it out, we were satisfied.

When our work day was done, the owner said he couldn't believe that people had so much strength and power to do all this work. He was feeling hopeless but seeing all this happen in 2 days made him believe that anything is possible. It gave him the hope that he can rebuild this business again. So when I came back this year, I was expecting to see them continuing their business. But when we got there, there was no sign of the building. They had torn it down, and we still don't know if they ever started business again or shut it down.

Last year, this area was completely wiped out. The ground was covered in sludge and trash, houses destroyed. As you can see in the picture, the ocean is right there so this area was hit horribly. The grave site was on slope, so it wasn't affected that bad compared to the rest.

Last year, this area was completely wiped out. The ground was covered in sludge and trash, houses destroyed. As you can see in the picture, the ocean is right there so this area was hit horribly. The grave site was on slope, so it wasn't affected that bad compared to the rest.